Famous Quotations By Shakespeare with Free Memory Aids

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INTRODUCING THE CLASSICS

William Shakespeare-1

©    Lesson Ideas By Bibi Baxter

Quotations from Works 

by William Shakespeare

(1564-1616)

THE CONTENTS OF THIS PAGE

RELEVANT EXTERNAL LINKS

 

<>()<>

Quotation about The Seven Ages Of Man 

from AS YOU LIKE IT by William Shakespeare

Jacques:  

All the world's a stage,

And all the men and women merely players:

They have their exits and their entrances;

And one man in his time plays many parts,

His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.

And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like a snail

Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,

Sighing like a furnace, with a woeful ballad

Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,

Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

 

<>()<>

Memory Aid by Bibi Baxter for the quotation about The Seven Ages Of Man from 

AS YOU LIKE IT by William Shakespeare

SEQUENCING EXERCISE

Instructions:  Number the lines according to the correct order.

..........  With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,

..........  With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

..........  Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,

..........  Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

..........  They have their exits and their entrances;

..........  That ends this strange eventful history,

..........  Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad

..........  Seeking the bubble reputation

..........  Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

..........  Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.

..........  Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,

..........  Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

..........  Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

..........  Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,

..........  In fair round belly with good capon lined,

..........  His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

..........  His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,

..........  Full of wise saws and modern instances;

..........  Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

..........  For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,

..........  Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,

..........  And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

..........  And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel

..........  And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts

..........  And shining morning face, creeping like snail

..........  And one man in his time plays many parts,

..........  And all the men and women merely players:

..........  All the world's a stage,

 

<>()<>

Quotation from Macbeth by William Shakespeare

FIRST WITCH

When shall we meet again

In thunder, lightning, or in rain?

 

SECOND WITCH

When the hurly-burly’s done,

When the battle’s lost and won.

 

THIRD WITCH

That will be ere the set of the sun.

 

FIRST WITCH

Where the place?

 

SECOND WITCH

Upon the heath

 

THIRD WITCH

There to meet with Macbeth

 

SECOND WITCH

Paddock calls.

 

THIRD WITCH

Anon!

 

ALL

Fair is foul and foul is fair:

Hover through the fog and filthy air.

Macbeth I, i, 1

Free exercise to help you memorise this quote

 

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Memory Aid  by Bibi Baxter  for quotation from Macbeth by William Shakespeare

FIRST WITCH

W_ _ _  s_ _ _ _  w_  m_ _ _  a_ _ _ _

I_  t_ _ _ _ _ ,  l _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _,  o_  i_   r_ _ _?

 

SECOND WITCH

W_ _ _  t_ _  h_ _ _ -b _ _ _ _’_ done,

W_ _ _  t_ _  b_ _ _ _ _’_ l _ _ _  a_ _  w_ _.

 

THIRD WITCH

T_ _ _  w_ _ _   b_  e_ _   t_ _  s_ _  o_  t_ _  s_ _.

 

FIRST WITCH

W_ _ _ _  t_ _  p_ _ _ _?

 

SECOND WITCH

U_ _ _  t_ _  h_ _ _ _

 

THIRD WITCH

T_ _ _ _  t_  m_ _ _  w_ _ _  M_ _ _ _ _ _

 

SECOND WITCH

P_ _ _ _ _ _  c_ _ _ _.

 

THIRD WITCH

A_ _ _!

 

ALL

F_ _ _  i_  f_ _ _  a_ _  f_ _ _  i_  f_ _ _:

H_ _ _ _  t_ _ _ _ _ _  t_ _  f_ _  a_ _  f_ _ _ _ _  a_ _.

THE MISSING WORDS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

again/air/and/anon/battle/be/calls/done/ere/

fair/filthy/fog/foul/heath/hover/hurly-burly/in/is/

lightning/lost/Macbeth/meet/of/or/paddock/place/rain/

set/shall/sun/that/the/there/

through/thunder/to/upon/we/when/where/will/with/won

Exercise by Bibi Baxter

Check your version with the original quotation

(Exercise prepared by Bibi Boarder)

 
 

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Quotations from Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;

I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.

The evil that men do, lives after them,

The good is oft interred with their bones;

So let it be with Caesar.  The noble Brutas

Hath told you that Caesar was ambitious;

If it were so, it was a grievous fault;

And grievously hath Caesar answered it.

Ib.[79]

For Brutus is an honourable man;

So are they all, all honourable men.

Ib.[88]

He was my friend, faithful and just to me:

But Brutus said he was ambitious;

And Brutus is an honourable man.

Ib.[91]

But yesterday the word of Caesar might

Have stood against the world;  now lies he there,

And none so poor to do him reverence.

Ib.[124]

If you have tear, prepare to shed them now,

You all do know this mantle:  I remember

The first time Caesar ever put it on;

‘Twas on a summer’s evening, in his tent,

That day he overcame the Nervii.

Ib.[174]

See what a rent the envious Casca made.

Ib.[180]

This was the most unkindest cut of all.

Ib.[188]

O!  What a fall was there, my countrymen;

Then I, and you, and all of us fell down,

Whilst bloody treason flourish’d over us,

O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel

The dint of pity;  these are gracious drops.

Ib.[195]

I come not friends to steal your away hearts;

I am no orator, as Brutus is,;

But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man,

That love my friend.

Ib.[220]

For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth,

Action, nor utterance, nor power of speech,

To stir men’s blood;  I only speak right on;

I tell you that which you yourselves do not know.

Julius Caesar, III.ii.[225]

Free exercise to help you memorise this quotation

 

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MEMORY AID by Bibi Baxter  for Quotation from Julius Caesar 

Sequencing Exercise

INSTRUCTIONS:  Write a number in the column on the right, indicating the order.  The first one has been done for you.

‘Twas on a summer’s evening, in his tent,  
Action, nor utterance, nor power of speech,  
And Brutus is an honourable man.   
And grievously hath Caesar answered it.  
And none so poor to do him reverence.  
But Brutus said he was ambitious;  
But yesterday the word of Caesar might  
But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man,  
For Brutus is an honourable man;  
For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth,  
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;

1

Hath told you that Caesar was ambitious;  
Have stood against the world;  now lies he there,  
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:  
I am no orator, as Brutus is;  
I come not friends to steal your away hearts;  
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.  
I tell you that which you yourselves do not know.  
If it were so, it was a grievous fault;  
If you have tear, prepare to shed them now,  
O!  What a fall was there, my countrymen;  
O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel  
See what a rent the envious Casca made.  
So are they all, all honourable men.  
So let it be with Caesar.  The noble Brutus  
That day he overcame the Nervii.  
That love my friend.  
The dint of pity;  these are gracious drops.  
The evil that men do, lives after them,  
The first time Caesar ever put it on;  
The good is oft interred with their bones;  
Then I, and you, and all of us fell down,  
This was the most unkindest cut of all.  
To stir men’s blood;  I only speak right on;  
Whilst bloody treason flourish’d over us,  
You all do know this mantle:  I remember  

Now check your version with the original quotation

(Exercise prepared by Bibi Baxter)

NOTE:  US spelling: honorable

 

<>()<>

Prologue from Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare

CHORUS: 

Two households, both alike in dignity,

In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,

From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,

Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean

From forth the fatal loins of these two foes,

A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life;

whose misadventur’d piteous overthrows

Do with their death bury their parents’ strife.

The fearful passage of their death-mark’d love,

And the continuance of their parents’ rage,

Which, but their children’s end, nought could remove,

Is now the two hours’ traffick of our stage;

The which if you with patient ears attend,

What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.

Free exercise to help you memorise this quotation

 

<>()<>

MEMORY AID by Bibi Baxter for the Prologue from Romeo & Juliet by William Shakespeare

INSTRUCTIONS:  Complete the gaps

CHORUS: 

T_ _  h_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ,  b_ _ _  a_ _ _ _  i_  d_ _ _ _ _ _ ,

I_  f_ _ _  V_ _ _ _ _ , w_ _ _ _  w_  l_ _  o_ _  s_ _ _ _ ,

F_ _ _  a_ _ _ _ _ _  g_ _ _ _ _  b_ _ _ _  t_  n_ _  m_ _ _ _ _ ,

W_ _ _ _  c_ _ _ _  b_ _ _ _  m_ _ _ _  c_ _ _ _  h_ _ _ _  u_ _ _ _ _ _

F_ _ _  f_ _ _ _  t_ _  f_ _ _ _  l_ _ _ _  o_  t_ _ _ _  t_ _  f_ _ _ ,

A  p_ _ _  o_  s_ _ _-c_ _ _ _’_  l_ _ _ _ _  t_ _ _  t_ _ _ _  l_ _ _;

w_ _ _ _  m_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _’_  p_ _ _ _ _ _  o_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 

D_  w_ _ _  t_ _ _ _  d_ _ _ _  b_ _ _  t_ _ _ _  p_ _ _ _ _ _’ s_ _ _ _ _ .

T_ _  f_ _ _ _ _ _  p_ _ _ _ _ _  o_  t_ _ _ _  d_ _ _ _-m_ _ _’_  l_ _ _ ,

A_ _   t_ _  c_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  o_  t_ _ _ _  p_ _ _ _ _ _’ r_ _ _,

W_ _ _ _ , b_ _  t_ _ _ _  c_ _ _ _ _ _ _ ’_  e_ _ , n_ _ _ _ _ c_ _ _ _  r_ _ _ _ _ ,

I_  n_ _  t_ _  t_ _  h_ _ _ _ ’  t_ _ _ _ _ _ _  o_  o_ _  s_ _ _ _;

T_ _  w_ _ _ _  i_  y_ _  w_ _ _  p_ _ _ _ _ _  e_ _ _  a_ _ _ _ _ ,

W_ _ _  h_ _ _  s_ _ _ _  m_ _ _ , o_ _  t_ _ _  s_ _ _ _  s_ _ _ _ _  t_  m_ _ _ .

Now check your version with the original quotation

(Exercise prepared by Bibi Baxter)

 

<>()<>

RICHARD II by William Shakespeare

THE QUEEN hears the Gardener telling two servants the King is deposed.

 

0! I am press’d to death through want of speaking.

Thou, old Adam’s likeness, set to dress this garden,

How dares thy harsh rude tongue sound this unpleasant news?

What Eve, what serpent, hath suggested thee

To make a second fall of cursed man?

why dost thou say King Richard is depos’d?

Dar’st thou, thou little better thing than earth,

Divine his downfall? Say, where, when and how

Cam’st thou by these ill tidings? Speak, thou wretch.

Nimble mischance, that art so light of foot,

Doth not thy embassage belong to me,

And am I last that knows it? 0! thou think’st

To serve me last, that I may longest keep

Thy sorrow in my breast. Come, ladies, go,

To meet at London London’s King in woe.

What! Was I born to this, that my sad look

Should grace the triumph of great Bolingbroke?

Gardener, for telling me these news of woe,

Pray God the plants thou graft’st may never grow.

Free exercise to help you memorise this quote

 

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MEMORY AID by Bibi Baxter for a quotation from RICHARD II by William Shakespeare

INSTRUCTIONS:  Complete the lines by matching the two halves 

0! I am press’d to death  

0! thou think’st    

Thou, old Adam’s likeness, 

belong to me,  

How dares thy harsh rude tongue

Come, ladies, go,    

What Eve, what serpent, 

hath suggested thee    

To make a second fall

King Richard is depos’d?

Why dost thou say 

London’s King in woe.

Dar’st thou, 

may never grow.

Divine his downfall? 

of cursed man?

Cam’st thou by these ill tidings?

of great Bolingbroke?

Nimble mischance, 

Say, where, when and how   

Doth not thy embassage 

set to dress this garden,

And am I last that knows it? 

sound this unpleasant news?

To serve me last, 

Speak, thou wretch.

Thy sorrow in my breast. 

that art so light of foot,

To meet at London 

that I may longest keep  

What! Was I born to this, 

that my sad look

Should grace the triumph 

these news of woe,

Gardener, for telling me 

thou little better thing than earth,

Pray God the plants thou graft’st

through want of speaking.

Now check your version with the original quotation

(Exercise prepared by Bibi Baxter) 

 

<>()<>

QUOTATION FROM TWELFTH NIGHT

by William Shakespeare

ACT II SCENE 11

Memory Aid

VIOLA

 I left no ring with her: what means this lady?

Fortune forbid my outside have not charmed her.

She made good view of me; indeed, so much,

That sure methought her eyes had lost her tongue,

For she did speak in starts distractedly.

She loves me sure: the cunning of her passion

Invites me in this churlish messenger.

None of my lord’s ring! why he sent her none.

I am the man - if it be so - as t’is —

Poor lady she were better love a dream.

Disguise, 1 see, thou art a wickedness,

Wherein the pregnant enemy does much.

How easy is it for the proper-false

In Women’s waxen hearts to set their forms.

Alas, our frailty is the cause, not we,

For such as we are made of, such we be.

How will this fadge? My master loves her dearly;

And 1, poor monster, fond as much on him

As she, mistaken, seems to dote on me.

What will become of this? As I am man,

Mv state is desperate for my master’s love;

As I am woman — now alas the day —

What thrifIless sighs shall poor Olivia breathe.

O Time, thou must untangle this, not I;

It is too hard a knot for me to untie.

Memory Aid

 

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Memory Aid by Bibi Baxter for the following quotation from TWELFTH NIGHT by William Shakespeare

ACT II SCENE 11

INSTRUCTIONS:  Write a number in the column on the right, indicating the order.  The first one has been done for you.

VIOLA

Alas, our frailty is the cause, not we,

 

And 1, poor monster, fond as much on him

 

As I am woman — now alas the day —

 

As she, mistaken, seems to dote on me.

 

Disguise, 1 see, thou art a wickedness,

 

For she did speak in starts distractedly.

 

For such as we are made of, such we be.

 

Fortune forbid my outside have not charmed her.

 

How easy is it for the proper-false

 

How will this fadge? My master loves her dearly;

 

I am the man - if it be so - as t’is —  

 

I left no ring with her: what means this lady?

1

In Women’s waxen hearts to set their forms.  

 

Invites me in this churlish messenger.  

 

It is too hard a knot for me to untie.

 

Mv state is desperate for my master’s love;  

 

None of my lord’s ring! why he sent her none.  

 

O  Time, thou must untangle this, not I;

 

Poor lady she were better love a dream.

 

She loves me sure: the cunning of her passion

 

She made good view of me; indeed, so much,  

 

That sure methought her eyes had lost her tongue,  

 

What thriftless sighs shall poor Olivia breathe.  

 

What will become of this? As I am man,

 

Wherein the pregnant enemy does much.

 

Exercise by Bibi Baxter 

Now check your version with the original quotation

 
 

<>()<>

QUOTATION FROM THE TEMPEST

by William Shakespeare

ACT I SCENE 2

Memory Aid

Enter ARIEL.

 

Ari, All hail, great master; grave sir, hail! I come

To answer thy best pleasure; be’t to fly,

To swim, to dive into the fire, to ride

On the curled clouds: to thy strong bidding, task

Arid, and all his quality.

 

Pro, Hast thou. spirit,

Performed to point the Tempest that I bade thee?

 

Ari, To every article.

I boarded the king’s ship: now on the beak,

Now in the waist, the deck, in every cabin,

I flamed amazement: sometime I ‘d divide,

And burn in many places; on the topmast

The yards and bowsprit would I flame distinctly,

Then meet and join. Jove’s lightnings, the pre­cursors

0’ the dreadful thunder-claps, more momentary

And sight-outrunning were not: the fire, and cracks

Of sulphurous roaring the most mighty Neptune

Seem to besiege, and make his bold waves tremble,

Yea, his dread trident shake.

 

Pro, My brave spirit!

Who was so firm, so constant, that this coil

Would not infect his reason?

 

Ari,  Not a soul

But felt a fever of the mad, and played

Some tricks of desperation. All, but mariners,

Plunged in the foaming brine, and quit the vessel,

Then all a-fire with me:   the king’s son, Ferdinand,

With hair up-staring (then like reeds, not hair),

Was the first man that leapt; cried, ‘Hell is empty,

And all the devils are here.’

 

Pro,  Why, that ‘s my spirit:

But was not this nigh shore?

Memory Aid

 

<>()<>

MEMORY AID by Bibi Baxter for the following quotation from THE TEMPEST

by William Shakespeare

ACT I SCENE 2

INSTRUCTIONS:  Complete the missing words

Enter ARIEL.

 

Ari, All ......................., great .......................; grave ......................., hail! I .......................

To ....................... thy best .......................; be’t to .......................,

To ......................., to ....................... into the ......................., to .......................

On the curled .......................: to thy strong ......................., task

Arid, and all his ........................

 

Pro, Hast thou. .......................,

....................... to ....................... the ....................... that I ....................... thee?

 

Ari, To every ........................

I ....................... the king’s .......................: now on the .......................,

Now in the ......................., the ......................., in every .......................,

I flamed .......................: sometime I‘d .......................,

And ....................... in many .......................; on the .......................

The ....................... and ....................... would I flame .......................,

Then ....................... and ........................ Jove’s ......................., the .......................

0’ the dreadful ......................., more .......................

And ....................... were not: the ......................., and .......................

Of ....................... roaring the most ....................... Neptune

Seem to ......................., and make his ....................... waves .......................,

Yea, his dread ....................... shake.

 

Pro, My brave spirit!

Who was so ......................., so ......................., that this .......................

Would not ....................... his .......................?

 

Ari,  Not a .......................

But ....................... a ....................... of the ......................., and played

Some ....................... of ........................ All, but .......................,

....................... in the ....................... brine, and ....................... the .......................,

Then all ....................... with me:   the .......................’s son, .......................,

....................... hair ....................... (then like ......................., not hair),

Was the ....................... man that .......................; cried, ‘....................... is empty,

And all the ....................... are here.’

 

Pro,  ......................., that‘s ....................... spirit:

But ....................... not this ....................... shore?

Exercise by Bibi Baxter

Now check your version with the original quotation

 

<>()<>

 

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